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The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the one

Spock’s sacrifice is a shadowy analogue of Christ’s passion

by Peter Benyola
Captain Spock succumbs to the effects of antimatter radiation poisoning to save the lives of the U.S.S. Enterprise crew. image: Paramount Pictures

Captain Spock succumbs to the effects of antimatter radiation poisoning to save the lives of the U.S.S. Enterprise crew. image: Paramount Pictures

 

Only
When I die
And realize
That I am born again
For dying is
A beginning
And I
have died
thousands of times
Sometimes
Several times a day
I am learning
That from each death
Comes a new vision
Of life
A new sense of the miracle
Of being and creation
For fear
Is worse than dying
Fear prevents discovery
And destroys the creative flow
Of God-man’s soul
And when I let my old self
Hardened and rigid
Die
I am re-born
Vital, open and fresh
And this discovery
This victory over the
Fear of death
Came
When I thought I was dead
And found you
So
Each time
I rise
Out of the ashes
Of my fear
I will gratefully
Think of you

— Will I Think of You?
Leonard Nimoy, 1974
I Am Spock, Chapter 12: Remember

On Friday, February 27, 2015, at age 83, Leonard Nimoy, the actor who won global and decades-long popularity as Star Trek‘s Mr. Spock, departed for “The undiscovered country from whose bourn No traveler returns.”

As the actor and poet confessed to often having long mental dialogues with his green-blooded alter ego, he probably would find it poetic justice to be remembered with Spock’s own last words to Jim Kirk, “Don’t grieve, Admiral. It is logical. The needs of the many outweigh … the needs of the few … or the one. I have been and ever shall be your friend. Live long and prosper.”

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