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Travelogue: Persevering in the Christian Life

About a decade later emerged another protester named George Wishart, who enlisted the protection of bodyguards. One of the bodyguards was John Knox and as George Wishart’s bodyguard, he carried a dagger.

ArtArtistsArtists by NameR J.M.L. Ralston John Knox Bearing the Sword before George Wishart, after the Attempted Assassination at Dundee, J.M.L. Ralston

John Knox Bearing the Sword before George Wishart, after the Attempted Assassination at Dundee, J.M.L. Ralston, 1879

“Now I think John Knox was a better preacher than he was a bodyguard, because George Wishart himself was martyred,” said Dr. Nichols.

When Wishart was martyred in 1546, his followers stormed the castle at St. Andrews and killed the cardinal who ordered the martyrdom of Wishart, they flung the cardinal’s body out the castle window, and they occupied the castle. Eventually, the French got involved, retook St. Andrews and arrested John Knox. From 1547 to 1549, Knox was in French confinement on a galley ship. All he did during that time was row. At the end of his confinement, it was a time of intense persecution in England, during the reign of Bloody Mary in the 1550s. It was a time of such intense martyrdom that immediately following it, John Foxe wrote his book, Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, so that the church in the coming generations would not forget the intensity of which that generation suffered.

Moses was very content tending the flocks, which is where Exodus chapter 3 begins. But God had plans for Moses, and he said, “I have sent you.”

The logo of Ligonier Ministries is the burning bush of Exodus chapter 3. Christ’s church as a body is called to semper reformanda, or to be continually reformed, and like the burning bush that miraculously maintained in the midst of Moses, God’s people are perpetually refined in His fiery presence, yet never consumed.

The logo of Ligonier Ministries is the burning bush of Exodus chapter 3. Christ’s church as a body is called to semper reformanda, or to be continually reformed, and like the burning bush that miraculously maintained in the midst of Moses, God’s people are perpetually refined in His fiery presence, yet never consumed.

“This is what we see in the life of a Patrick Hamilton. A Paul Craw. We see it in the life of a George Wishart. We see it in John Knox,” said Dr. Nichols. “And in this last phrase, ‘You shall serve God.’ Moses’ task is very simple. His task is to make God known, and and to lead the people of God out of Egypt. And that’s what he does. God is proclaimed in the plagues. When Moses meets up with Jethro again later in the Book of Exodus, Jethro says, ‘Now I know that this God of Israel, this is the true God.'”

Dr. Nichols referred to the kite outside the place where lectures were taking place, and Ligonier’s logo with the phrase, Helping people grow in the knowledge of God and His holiness. “This infinite, eternal, unchanging, perfect in His wisdom, in His holiness,” Dr. Nichols said, “This is what we are called to do. This is what the Scots did. This is our legacy … Let’s not enshrine them in a museum, that they may be living examples for the task that is before us. As we take up our task, God is with us, God has sent us. It’s very simple: Serve Him. Proclaim His name in all that you do.”

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